Wall of Fame Committee seeks nominations for 2020 induction: Deadline is Feb. 29

The Liberty Wall of Fame Committee is now accepting nominations for the 2020 induction ceremony.

The Wall of Fame provides a wonderful opportunity to honor and celebrate the outstanding accomplishments of Liberty alumni. 

The distinguished men and women previously named to the Wall of Fame represent an extraordinary range of personal and professional achievements and serve as role models to our students.  Their personal accomplishments in an array of careers and endeavors exemplify what can be attained through initiative and commitment.

The 2020 inductee will be invited to a reception held just prior to the Liberty High School 2020 graduation commencement and will be introduced during the graduation ceremony. A plaque for each inductee is on permanent display in the Liberty High School lobby.

Nomination Process

Anyone may nominate a Liberty alumnus for this distinction by submitting a Wall of Fame nomination application. The deadline to submit nominations has been extended until Feb. 29.

The Wall of Fame Selection Committee will review the nominations and determine the new inductees to the Liberty Wall of Fame. All information discussed is kept confidential. A deceased alumni may also be nominated.

The selection committee is made up of five to nine volunteers representing the Liberty community, including school district staff, alumni, and community and board of education members.

Camp Invention returns to Liberty this summer!

a student looks over a small robot
A student builds a small robot at Camp Invention. This summer enrichment program returns to Liberty in August 2020.

Camp Invention is returning to Liberty Central School District!

In partnership with the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Liberty High School will again offer the nationally acclaimed Camp Invention program to students entering grades K through 6.

This exciting, weeklong summer adventure provides lessons that explore connections between science, technology, engineering and innovation. Students rotate through several hands-on activities each day while using teamwork, creative thinking and problem-solving skills to invent unique solutions to real-world challenges.

The week begins Aug. 17, 2020 with Liberty Makerspace teacher Tamika Terry serving as director of the all-new 2020 program, Elevate!

During Camp Invention, young innovators will:

  • Build a cityscape out of upcycled materials, navigate planes through a storm and take apart a robot they’ll bring home at the end of the program.
  • Learn the value of their creativity as they sketch and build prototypes, design logos, market their invention and protect their intellectual property.
  •  Collaborate and discover solutions to protect the Earth’s ecosystems as they compete in zipline races, explore energy conservation and help wildlife habitats.
  • Discover the great inventors behind their favorite sports, play high-energy games and design the ultimate sports complex.

Camp Invention’s activities give participants the opportunity to explore, create and build confidence as they bring their biggest ideas to life.

Local educators facilitate the program and enthusiastic high school students serve as Leadership Interns, ensuring that one staff member is in place for every eight children.

Register online by visiting the Camp Investion website or call 800-968-4332. Use promo code SUM25 to save $25 (expires March 31) or SUM15 to save $15 (expires May 12) off the $235 registration fee.

It’s flu season: A guide for parents

The new year has brought with it a spike in flu cases, and health officials warn that this flu season could be the worst in years.

In New York, there was a 74 percent increase in confirmed cases of influenza – “the flu” – over the recent holidays, with 9,200 cases reported to the New York State Department of Health for the week ending Dec. 28, bringing the statewide total to 22,800 cases this season.

Infants and young children are at greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. That’s why the Department of Health recommends that all children 6 months and older get the flu vaccine.

What is the flu?

The flu, or influenza, is an infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can spread from person to person. The flu comes on suddenly. Most people with the flu feel very tired and have a fever, headache, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, sore muscles, and and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea. The cough can last two or more weeks.

Most people with the flu are sick for about a week, and then they feel better. But, some people, especially young children, pregnant women, older people, and people with chronic health problems, can get very sick

Protect your child

Flu shots can be given to children 6 months and older.

Health experts advice that parents and guardians should get the flu vaccine for themselves and encourage thier child’s close contacts to get the flu vaccine, too. This is very important if your child is younger than 5, or has a chronic health problem such as asthma or diabetes. Because children under 6 months can’t be vaccinated they rely on those around them to get an annual flu vaccine.

Wash your hands often and cover your coughs and sneezes. It’s best to use a tissue and quickly throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands. This will prevent the spread of germs.

Tell children to:

  • Stay away from people who are sick
  • Clean hands often
  • Keep their hands away from their face
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, or to cough into their sleeve, not their hand
  • Throw tissues in the trash after they are used.
  • Proper hand washing
  • Wash your children’s hands with soap and water. Wash them for as long as it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice.
  • If soap and water are not handy, use hand sanitizer. It should be rubbed into hands until the hands are dry.

How does the flu spread?

People who have the flu usually cough, sneeze and have a runny nose. The droplets in a cough, sneeze or runny nose contain the flu virus. Other people can get the flu by breathing in these droplets or by getting them in their nose or mouth.

Most healthy adults may be able to spread the flu from one day before getting sick to up to 5 days after getting sick. This can be longer in children and in people people with weaker immune systems.

What if my child seems sick?

Contact your doctor if you think your child is sick.

Seek emergency care or take your child to a doctor immediately if your child has any of these warning or emergency signs:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish or gray skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids (not going to the bathroom or making as much urine)
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  •  Symptoms improve, but then return with fever and worse cough

Can my child go to school with the flu?

No. Children with the flu should be isolated in the home, away from other people. They should also stay home until they have no fever without the use of fever-control medicines and they feel well for 24 hours.

To learn more visit  www.cdc.gov/flu/

Order of the Eastern Star donates much-needed school supplies

A big Liberty Thank You to the Order of the Easter Star Starlight Chapter, Number 74, which faithfully donates school supplies to Liberty Elementary, and their timing couldn’t be more perfect!

Pencils, crayons, folders and other supplies often must be replaced or replenished during the school year, and it’s wonderful to have a stash on hand so students always have what they need.

Four adults and nine students stand with boxes of school supplies
LES students and Principal Harris meet with Worthy Matron, Pamela Kennedy and member Jeanneta Hutchins to accept their generous donation of school supplies.

Parking at Liberty Elementary School

Visitors to Liberty Elementary School are asked to refrain from parking in the Ideal Supermarket parking lot.
The supermarket’s owners kindly ask that LES parents, guardians, and staff use the school’s parking lot.

The December edition of “LES News” is on the air!

“LES News,” a video newcast brought to you by our Liberty Elementary students with the expert assistance of teacher Tamika Terry, is a great way to learn about some of the terrific things happening in the elementary school.

Here’s the latest edition, along with some of the students’ earlier broadcasts:

What’s the difference between half day and full day Pre-K?

Many parents and guardians may wonder which is better: full day Pre-K or half day Pre-K.  The answer is “neither.” There is a difference and that difference is in the length of the day.  The full day Pre-K program offers students more time to socialize with friends at school. It’s not the length of the day, but the experience itself that matters for your Pre-K child.  At Liberty Elementary School, we strive to provide all Pre-K students with a high quality Pre-K experience that is focused on social interaction and language development.

Students in the full and half day Pre-K programs receive the same opportunities for instruction through daily structured play.  All Pre-K children engage in a variety of well-designed social activities such as literacy learning centers, construction sites, science exploration and experiments, dramatic play, songs, games, movement and interactive applications on classroom technology.  Students interact and speak with their peers and teachers throughout their day, which helps promote language strong language skills.

One of the top priorities of Pre-K is to engage students in language usage.  Whether a child is enrolled in a full day or half day program, parents and/or guardians can help at home by engaging their child in conversation.  Every moment of the day is an opportunity to notice everything around you, ask and answer questions and facilitate learning!

Student entrepreneurs enjoy Market Economy Day at LES

What are the advantages and disadvantages of a market economy?
What skills are needed to be an entrepreneur?
How can I balance creating a quality product while making a profit?

These are the questions our young entrepreneurs at Liberty Elementary School asked themselves leading up to their Market Economy Day on June 14

Market Economy Day is a third grade tradition that seeks to increase the financial literacy of the next generation of future entrepreneurs. By using a school store as a means to teach challenging subjects like finance, business and investing, teachers seek to train a new group of future business owners and creative thinkers.

In this unique form of instruction, students frequently encounter situations that provide the opportunity to relate economic terms and concepts to real classroom situations. The instruction leading up to Market Day focuses on the basics of economics, entrepreneurship customer service and money management.

Free meals for kids starts July 1 in Liberty

To ensure no child is left hungry over the summer, the Liberty Central School District will serve nutritious summer meals to at no cost from July 1 of this year through August 23. Participating sites (listed below) will provide free, nutritious meals to kids and teens 18 and under.

Meals will be provided to all children without charge. There are no income requirements to participate in this summer program.

This is the sixth year that Liberty has offered the program. Meals will be provided to all children without charge. There are no income requirements to participate in this summer program, and students do not have to be enrolled in Liberty Central Schools.

Francis A. Hanofee Park
136 Sunset Lake Road

From July 1 to August 16, breakfast and lunch will be served each weekday at Hanofee Park. Breakfast will be served 8:30-9:30 a.m. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Liberty Middle School
125 Buckley Street

From July 1 to August 23, the district will also provide breakfast and lunch each weekday at the Liberty Middle School. Breakfast will be served 7:30-9 a.m. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Both sites are considered “restricted open sites,” meaning that children who do not attend the day camps or summer school programs that take place at Hanofee Park or Liberty Middle School are welcome to visit either location for a free meal.

For additional information, please contact the district’s business office at (845) 292-6171.

Post navigation