Camp Invention begins Monday, Aug. 19!

Camp Invention, a summer enrichment program offered at schools nationwide, begins Monday, Aug. 19 at Liberty High School!

During Camp Invention’s new program, Supercharged, students in kindergarten through Grade 6 will build confidence, learn to collaborate and transform their wild imaginations into epic creations. Supercharged  features hands-on activities to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) learning; building resourcefulness and problem-solving skills, and encourages entrepreneurship.

Campers will learn creative problem-solving skills while coding and programming futuristic robots, uncovering ancient fossils, designing high-tech superhero gadgets and exploring radio frequencies.

Students in grade 7-9 will take part in the camp’s Leaders-in-Training program, gaining mentoring and collaboration skills while helping guide campers throughout the week.

Liberty Elementary School teacher and MakerSpace facilitator Tamika Terry will lead the program, which meets 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and features hands-on STEM activities teaching campers to question, explore, break through obstacles and even embrace failure.

Each day in this five-day long camp will focus on four modules and their coordinating projects:

Creative Problem Solving

Students team up to rebuild ships and design underwater equipment in Deep Sea Mystery.

STEM Application

In DIY Orbot, participants explore circuit boards, motors and gears as they design a remote-control bot to take on obstacles from sports to dance.

Innovation

Students collaborate with inventor superheroes and take on the role of engineers, fabricators and innovators to conquer villains in Innovation Force.

Confidence

Kids become successful entrepreneurs in Farm Tech, as they code bots to turn a polluted wasteland into a money-making machine and create devices to save animals.

LES 2019-20 classroom supply lists available

Mrs. Bayer’s Kindergarten Supply List

  • 1 book bag labeled with your child’s name
  • 2 packages  #2 pencils
  • 1 box of erasers
  • 2 composition notebooks
  • 12 glue sticks
  • 3  2-pocket folders
  • 4 EXPO dry erase markers
  • 2 standard boxes of 24 crayons
  • 1 package of markers
  • 1 box of tissues
  • 1 container of play dough
  • 1 box of Ziploc bags (quart or gallon)
  • 1 set of clothes (if needed for accidents)
  • 1 pair of extra sneakers for PE days
  • Girls: Washable watercolor paint 8 count set
  • Boys: 1 Elmer’s liquid glue

Ms. Benjamin’s Supply List

  • 24 #2 pencils (Ticonderoga are best)
  • 1 package of pencil-top erasers or the rectangular ones
  • 2 marble composition notebooks
  • Three 2-pocket folders (the pockets on the bottom work best)
  • 2 small boxes of crayons or colored pencils-No markers!
  • 5 large glue sticks
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 3 large boxes of tissues (to be shared)
  •  1 package of Post It Notes
  • Pencil case
  • 2 packages of dry erase markers. Fine tip works best
  • Headphones (earbuds are best)

Label notebooks and folders with your child’s name. Most other supplies
(crayons, pencils, glue post-it notes, etc.) will all be shared throughout the
classroom so please do not label these items.

Mrs. Bury’s Kindergarten Supply List

  • 24 Eimers Glue Sticks (no Ross or Kidstick,please)
  • 2 Pocket Folders (1 for take-home papers, 1 for a writing folder)
  • 1 standard composition notebook
  • 1 pkg. expo dry erase markers
  • 2 pkg. of 24 crayola crayons
  • 1 pkg. crayola classic markers
  • 1 pkg. of colored pencils
  • 2 packages of #2 pencils
  • 1 package of index cards
  • 4 pkg. of baby wipes and 2 boxes of tissues
  • A change of clothes in a zip-lock bag with child’s name on the
    bag,  label each article of clothing
  • Boys: 1 box of gallon size zip-lock bags, 1 box of snack size zip lock bags, regular sized paper plates (non-wax kind)
  • Girls: 1 box of gallon size ziplock bags, 1 box of sandwich size zip-lock bags, small paper plates
  • To keep germs down to a minimum, please feel free to send in tissues and hand sanitizer.

Ms. Cinque’s and Mrs. Smith’s  Supply List

  • Headphones for iPad
  • #2 pencils (no mechanical pencils)
  • 1 package of pencil-top erasers or the rectangular ones
  • 3 marble composition notebooks
  • 4 2-pocket folders (the pockets on the bottom work best)
  • a small box of crayons or colored pencils
  • package of glue sticks
  • large pack of Post It Notes
  • pair of blunt-tipped scissors
  • three large boxes of tissues
  • two packages of dry erase markers
  • one clipboard
  • 2-3 highlighters

Mrs. Colao’ s supply list

Required:

  • Backpack. Larger ones work better
  • Folder (plastic ones last longer)- to send work, correspondence home
  • Composition notebook – daily communication purposes
  • 1 package of #2 pencils
  • 1 hard plastic/metal pencil box
  • 8 glue sticks
  • 1 box of markers
  • 1 box of Crayola crayons
  • 1 box of Zip lock sandwich bags
  • Extra set of clothing labeled with your child’s name

Optional and appreciated:

  • Tissues
  • 2 gallon zip lock bags
  • dry erase markers (fine tip)

Mrs. Conklin’s  and Mrs. James’ Supply List

  • Erasers (3)
  • Glue Sticks (2-8 packs)
  • Plastic Pencil Box (1)
  • Box of Pencils
  • Box of Crayons (2-24 packs)
  • Colored Pencils (8/12 pack)
  • Marble Notebooks (3)
  • Folders: 1 of each Yellow, Orange, Purple
  • Folder of Choice (2)
  • Scissors (1)
  • Hand Sanitizer (2)
  • Disinfecting wipes (2)
  • Tissues (5)

Mrs. Countrymen’s Supply List

  • 2 red poly (plastic) pocket folder (no fasteners)
  • 2 boxes of Crayons (no more than 24/box)
  • 2 pocket folders of your choice (please put names on their folders)
  • 2 marble composition notebooks wide rule (please put names on them)
  • 2 dozen pencils (Try to buy Ticonderoga pencils)
  • Expo dry-erase markers (6 fine tip  & 6 bullet tip)
  •  1 package of Crayola markers
  • 6 glue sticks
  • 1 package of 6 post-it notes
  • 3 large boxes of tissues
  • 1 package of 2 large pink erasers
  • 1 box of Ziploc bags (girls buy gallon, boys buy quart)
  •  1 book bag or backpack labeled with name to carry supplies and homework
  • extra change of clothes to leave at school (gym sneakers are a good idea too)

Mrs. Faria’s Supply List

  • 1 red pocket folder &  1 blue pocket folder
  • 2 packages of Crayola twistable crayons 8 pack (no more than 24)
  • 1 pocket folder of your choice
  • 1 heavy duty pocket folder (please put names on their folders)
  • 2 marble composition notebook (please put names on them)
  •  32 #2 yellow pencils (No fancy pencils. Sharpened, Ticonderoga pencils are best)
  • 1 pack of 4 Black Expo dry-erase markers
  • 1 pack fine point Black Expo dry­ erase markers
  • 1 package of 3×5 index card
  • 15 glue sticks
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 3 large boxes of tissues
  •  1 package of 2 large pink erasers
  • 1 box of sandwich or snack size Ziploc bags
  •  1 pair of earbuds (for personal use)
  • $4 for Scholastic News Subscription

Mrs. Farrand’s and Mrs. Schafer’s Supply List

  • 2 or 3 boxes of pencils (Dixon/Ticonderoga sharpen the best!)
  • Pencil top erasers
  • Student scissors
  • 12 glue sticks
  • 4 pocket folders
  • 3 composition notebooks
  • Crayons
  • 1 box of markers
  • Pencil box/case
  • 3 boxes of tissues
  • 1 box black dry erase markers
  • 1 pair of ear buds for student school iPad

Mrs. Fodor’s Supply List

  • 6 pocket folders (please put names on their folders)
  •  3 boxes of Crayons (no more than 24)
  • 2 packages of #2 pencils
  •  4 marble composition notebooks with name label
  • l package of magnetic letters
  • 2 packs of Expo dry-erase markers
  • l package of post-its
  • 30 glue sticks
  •  l pair of scissors
  • 2 large boxes of tissues (lo be shared)
  •  l package of large pink erasers
  • $6 for Scholastic News
  • l box of gallon size Ziploc bags
  •  l box of sandwich or snack size Ziploc bags
  •  l package of paper plates
  • l package of plastic cups
  • l set of clothes,  sneakers
  • l package of Play-Dough
  • l book bag or backpack (Labeled with name to carry supplies and homework)
  • l package of index cards

Fourth Grade Team  Supply List

  •  1 package of Crayola colored pencils (primary colors)
  • 24 #2 pencils (Ticonderoga are best!)
  • 1-2 small hand-held pencil sharpener(s)
  • 6 Marble (Composition) notebooks
  • 1 box Crayola Crayons
  • 4 – 6 Elmer’s Glue sticks
  • 2-4 packages of yellow Post It Notes
  • 5 2-pocket folders (Reading, Writing, Math, Social Studies/Science)
  •  3 boxes of tissues
  •  2 packages of wide-ruled white loose leaf paper
  •  2 packages Dry Erase Markers
  •  1 pair of scissors
  • One, 1″ binder
  • Pencil erasers
  •  Ruler
  •  Protractor

Mrs. Gorr’s and Ms. Green’s  Supply List

  • Crayola crayons ( no more than 24)
  • 2 boxes of #2 pencils
  • 5 glue sticks
  •  Three sturdy pocket folders (with bottom pockets only)
  • 1 large box of tissues
  •  Scissors
  •  A backpack or book bag to carry supplies and homework.
  • 1 package of index cards
  •  4 large erasers
  •  Two composrnon notebooks ( No Spiral bound books)
  • Four fine point dry erase markers (No fat tips)
  •  1 pack of Post-its

Send in an extra set of clothes to be kept at school in case of accidents. Label all supplies with your child’s name.

Ms. Hand’s Supply List

  • 4 dozen #2 pencils
  • 3 spiral notebooks
  • 3 2-pocket folders
  • 1 pencil case
  • 1 box of crayons or color pencils
  • 1box of markers
  • 3 small glue sticks
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 4 boxes of tissues (to be shared)
  • 2 packs of dry erase markers
  • 1 package of post-it notes
  • 1pack of highlighters
  • 1 package of baby wipes
  • 1set of headphones (please do not spend a lot of money)

Mrs. Hoffman’s Supply List

  •  Headphones or earbuds for iPod
  • Two dozen # 2 pencils
  • 1 package of pencil-top erasers or the rectangular ones
  •  Four marble composition notebooks
  • Four 2-pocket folders (pockets on the bottom work best)
  • A small box of crayons or colored pencils
  • A package of glue sticks
  •  A pencil case
  • Two pocks of Post It Notes
  • Pair of scissors (no sharp tips please!)
  • Two boxes of tissues (to be shored)
  • Two packages of dry erase markers

Mrs. Houghtaling’s  Supply List

  • 24 #2 pencils (Ticonderoga brand pencils are best!)
  • 1 package of pencil-top erasers or the rectangular ones
  • 3 marble composition or spiral bound notebooks – see below
  • 6 two-pocket folders (Pockets on the bottom work best!) – see below
  • Small box of crayons or colored pencils
  • 1 package of glue sticks
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 2 large boxes of tissues (to be shared)
  • 1 multipack of 3×3 inch Post It Notes {lighter colors work best)
  • 1 package of loose-leaf paper
  • Pencil Case
  • 1 package of black dry erase markers
  • 1 handheld pencil sharpener with receptacle to hold shavings
  • 3 highlighters (one yellow, one blue, one green)
  • headphones or earbuds for using with the iPads

Following the color coded system below helps stay students organized. Keep this in mind when shopping for folders and notebooks.

Reading/ELA folder and notebook: red
Math folder and notebook: blue
Mini Economy folder: green
HW folder and notebook: your choice
eSpark folder: yellow
Fundations folder: purple

Label notebooks and folders with your child’s full name.

Ms. Kehrley’s Supply List

  • 6 pocket folders with name labels
  •  3 boxes of Crayons (no more than 24)
  • 2 packages of #2 pencils
  • 4 marble composition notebooks with name labels
  • 1 package of index cards
  • 2 packs of Expo dry-erase markers
  •  1 package of post-its
  • 30 glue sticks
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 2 large boxes of tissues
  • 1 package of large pink erasers
  • $6 for Scholastic News
  • 1 box of gallon size Ziploc bags
  • 1 box of sandwich or snack size Ziploc bags 1 package of paper plates
  • 1 package of plastic cups
  • 1 set of clothes & sneakers
  • 1 package of Play-Dough
  •  1 book bag or backpack (Labeled with name to carry supplies and homework)

Mrs. Kline’s Supply List

  • 2 packages of Crayola colored pencils (primary colors)
  •  24 #2 pencils (Ticonderoga brand pencils are bestl)
  • 6 Marble (Composition) notebook
  • 1 box Crayola Crayons
  • 4 – 6 Eimers Glue sticks
  • 2-3 packages of yellow Post It Notes
  • 4 two-pocket folders (Reading, Writing, Math, Social Studies/Science)
  •  2 boxes of tissues
  • 2 packages of wide- ruled white loose-leaf paper
  • 2 packages Expo Dry Erase MarkeRS
  • 1 pair of scissorS
  • Erasers
  • 1 package of yellow highlighters
  • 1 one inch binder

Mrs. Knight’s Kindergarten Supply List

  • 24 Elmers Glue Sticks (no Ross or Kidstick,please)
  • 2 Pocket Folders (1 for take-home papers. 1 plain red one for writing folder in class)
  • 1 standard composition notebook
  • 2 pkg. expo dry erase markers
  • 1 pkg. of 24 crayola crayons
  • 1 pkg. crayola classic markers
  • 1 pkg. of colored pencils
  • 4 pkg. of baby wipes and 2 boxes of tissues
  • A change of clothes in a zip-lock bag with child’s name on the bag,  please label each article of clothing
  • Boys: 1 box of gallon size ziplock bags, 1 box of snack size zip­ lock bags, regular sized paper plates (non-wax kind)
  • Girls: 1 box of gallon size ziplock bags, 1 box of sandwich size zip-lock bags, small paper plates

To keep germs down to a minimum, please feel free to send in
tissues and hand sanitizer.

Ms. Kratz’s Supply List

  • Backpack
  • 2 plastic folders
  • 1 blue paper folder
  • 1 pack of #2 pencils (Ticonderoga are the best)
  • 2 marble note books (wide ruled)
  • 2 pack of white 3×5 cards
  • 10 glue sticks
  • 1 standard box of 24 Crayola crayons
  • 1 (10 count) pack of Crayola markers (classic colors)
  • 1 box of 12 count colored pencils
  • 4 dry erase markers (fine tip)
  • 4 dry erase markers (bullet tip)
  • 2 boxes of tissues
  • 1 pair of child scissors
  • Girls – 1 box of quart zip lock bags
  • Boys – 1 box of gallon zip lock bags

Mrs. Kutschera-Zombo ‘s Supply List

  • 1 box of 24 crayons (Crayola brand please)
  • 2 dozen number 2 pencils (Ticonderoga brand please)
  • 1 box colored pencils (sharpened)
  • 1 box fine tipped dry-erase makers (black)
  • 2 highlighters (any color)
  •  1 personal pencil sharpener that catches the shavings.
  • 2 large boxes of tissues
  • Post-It Notes
  • 1 pack of index cards with lines
  • 1 set of Earbuds or Head Phones (these will not be shared)
  • 1 plastic pencil pouch
  • Plastic pencil box (label with your child’s name)
  • A backpack to carry daily notices and schoolwork.
  • If your child brings money please put in a small purse or envelope labeledwith their name on it.
  • Healthy snack (every day)
  • Please send an extra set of clothes to be kept at school in case of accidents.
  • An individual water bottle-to be filled nightly at home (please label with
    your child’s name).

Mrs. Poley-Gorr’s Supply List

  • 48, #2 Pencils (Ticonderoga works the best)
  • 4 large pink erasers
  • Student scissors
  • 8 glue sticks
  • 4 dry erase markers
  • 2 yellow highlighters
  • 4 pocket folders
  • 3 composition (not spiral) notebooks (wide ruled)
  • Colored pencils
  • Crayons (24pack)
  • Markers (8 pack)
  • Pencil I tool box
  • 2 boxes of tissues
  • A backpack or book bag to carry homework
  • A small purse or wallet with your child’s name for ice cream money

Miss Sharrin’s Supply List

  • Backpack
  • 2 folders, any style (Please label with your child’s name)
  • 1 pack of #2 pencils
  • 2 large erasers
  • 1 soft pencil case
  • 2 composition notebooks (wide-ruled) ❏ 2 packs of 3x5” cards
  • 4 glue sticks
  • 1 box of colored pencils
  • 1 box of markers
  • 4 dry erase markers (Fine tip)
  • 2 boxes of tissues (large)
  • Boys: 1 box of ziploc bags- quart size
  • Girls: 1 box of ziploc bags- gallon size
  • Extra change of clothes

Lista de útiles escolares de la Miss Sharrin

  • Mochila
  • 2 carpetas (etiqueta con el nombre de tu hijo)
  • 1 paquete de lápices numero 2
  • 2 gomas de borrar grandes
  • 1 estuche suave de los lapices
  • 2 cuadernos de composición (de regla ancha)
  • 2 paquetes de tarjetas de 3×5 “
  • 4 barras de pegamento
  • 1 caja de lápices de colores
  • 1 caja de marcadores
  • 4 marcadores de borrado en seco (punta fina)
  • 2 cajas de pañuelos (grandes)
  • Niños: 1 caja de bolsas ziploc – tamaño cuarto
  • Niñas: 1 caja de bolsas ziploc – tamaño galón
  • Cambio extra de ropa

Mrs. VanLeuven’s Supply List

  • 1 red pocket folder
  • 1 blue pocket folder
  • 1 pocket folder of your choice (Used for homework folder)
    (Please put names on their folders)
  • 2 boxes of Crayons (no more than 24/box)
  • 2 marble composition notebooks (Please put names on them)
  • 2 packages of pencils
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 2 packs of 4 Black Expo dry­ erase markers (1 pack of fine point)
  • 1 package of 3×5 index cards
  • 12 glue sticks
  • 1 package of post-it notes
  • 3 large boxes of tissues
  • 1 package of 2 large pink erasers
  • 1 box of sandwich or gallon Ziploc bags
  • 1 set of earbuds
  • $3 for Scholastic News Subscription
  • 1 book bag or backpack labeled with name to carry supplies and homework

Ms. Vasta’s Supply List

  • 1 book bag (back pack) labeled with child’s name
  • 1 set of clothes (if needed for ‘accidents’ or spills)
  • 1 pair of headphones
  • 3 boxes of crayons (Crayola preferred)
  • 1 box of Crayola markers
  • 8 glue sticks
  • 1 composition notebook
  • 1 one subject spiral notebook
  • 2 packages
  • #2 pencils (Ticonderoga brand preferred)
  • 1 package of colored pencils
  • 2 cans of any colored play-doh
  • 2- two pocket folders- Please do not write your child’s name on these
  • box of gallon size Ziploc bags
  • 1 box of sandwich or snack bags
  • 1 package of paper plates
  • 1 8oz package of plastic cups

Supplies that can be donated:

  • Tissues
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Baby Wipes

Mrs. Williams’s Supply List

  • Crayola crayons 24 pack only
  • 24 #2 pencils YELLOW (sharpened, no fancy pencils)
  • 1 pair of scissors
  • 10 glue sticks
  • 4 sturdy pocket folders (bottom pocket) plastic preferred
  • 2 boxes of tissues
  • 2 large erasers (to be replenished as the year goes on)
  • 4 black and white composition notebooks
  • 3 Low Odor Expo markers (black only)
  • 12 pack colored pencils

LES teachers meet authors, experts at summer reading conference

Six teachers in a group photo
LES teachers attended the Scholastic Reading Summit on July 18.

Several Liberty Elementary School teachers attended the Scholastic Reading Summit for a day of professional development.

The conference, which was held on July 18 in Greenwich, CT, was an opportunity to attend workshops, meet authors, and network and learn from leading educational experts from across the nation.

Mrs. Philips, Mrs. Hess-Colao, Ms. Benjamin, Mrs. Farrand, Mrs. Bury, Mrs. Kratz, Ms. Feely and Mrs. Farrand, who organizes the LES Scholastic Book Fair twice each year, attended the summit.

We can’t wait to see the books and activities they bring back to our LES students in September!

What’s the difference between half day and full day Pre-K?

Many parents and guardians may wonder which is better: full day Pre-K or half day Pre-K.  The answer is “neither.” There is a difference and that difference is in the length of the day.  The full day Pre-K program offers students more time to socialize with friends at school. It’s not the length of the day, but the experience itself that matters for your Pre-K child.  At Liberty Elementary School, we strive to provide all Pre-K students with a high quality Pre-K experience that is focused on social interaction and language development.

Students in the full and half day Pre-K programs receive the same opportunities for instruction through daily structured play.  All Pre-K children engage in a variety of well-designed social activities such as literacy learning centers, construction sites, science exploration and experiments, dramatic play, songs, games, movement and interactive applications on classroom technology.  Students interact and speak with their peers and teachers throughout their day, which helps promote language strong language skills.

One of the top priorities of Pre-K is to engage students in language usage.  Whether a child is enrolled in a full day or half day program, parents and/or guardians can help at home by engaging their child in conversation.  Every moment of the day is an opportunity to notice everything around you, ask and answer questions and facilitate learning!

Student entrepreneurs enjoy Market Economy Day at LES

What are the advantages and disadvantages of a market economy?
What skills are needed to be an entrepreneur?
How can I balance creating a quality product while making a profit?

These are the questions our young entrepreneurs at Liberty Elementary School asked themselves leading up to their Market Economy Day on June 14

Market Economy Day is a third grade tradition that seeks to increase the financial literacy of the next generation of future entrepreneurs. By using a school store as a means to teach challenging subjects like finance, business and investing, teachers seek to train a new group of future business owners and creative thinkers.

In this unique form of instruction, students frequently encounter situations that provide the opportunity to relate economic terms and concepts to real classroom situations. The instruction leading up to Market Day focuses on the basics of economics, entrepreneurship customer service and money management.

Free meals for kids starts July 1 in Liberty

To ensure no child is left hungry over the summer, the Liberty Central School District will serve nutritious summer meals to at no cost from July 1 of this year through August 23. Participating sites (listed below) will provide free, nutritious meals to kids and teens 18 and under.

Meals will be provided to all children without charge. There are no income requirements to participate in this summer program.

This is the sixth year that Liberty has offered the program. Meals will be provided to all children without charge. There are no income requirements to participate in this summer program, and students do not have to be enrolled in Liberty Central Schools.

Francis A. Hanofee Park
136 Sunset Lake Road

From July 1 to August 16, breakfast and lunch will be served each weekday at Hanofee Park. Breakfast will be served 8:30-9:30 a.m. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Liberty Middle School
125 Buckley Street

From July 1 to August 23, the district will also provide breakfast and lunch each weekday at the Liberty Middle School. Breakfast will be served 7:30-9 a.m. Lunch will be served 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Both sites are considered “restricted open sites,” meaning that children who do not attend the day camps or summer school programs that take place at Hanofee Park or Liberty Middle School are welcome to visit either location for a free meal.

For additional information, please contact the district’s business office at (845) 292-6171.

Learn more about the NYSED Parent Dashboard

The New York State Education Department (NYSED) is developing a Parent Dashboard to increase transparency and make information about school performance and other school-level data easier for parents and the public to access. This is part of New York’s ESSA plan.

NYSED is gathering feedback from parents and stakeholders to guide the work of developing the Parent Dashboard. NYSED will use this feedback to identify the data that is most useful to parents and the public.

Click here to review frequently asked questions and watch a brief video about the Parent dashboard. 

Is your child ready for pre-k/kindergarten?

As the calendar pages flip toward September, you might be asking if your child is ready for school. Whatever age your child is when they start school, you can help them enter the classroom with confidence by being your child’s first and most important teacher. To ensure the best possible school experience, there are skills and tasks that all children should be comfortable with before entering the classroom.

1. Teach independence

The more things a child can do on their own, the more time they, and their teacher, will spend on classroom activities. Practice having your child:

  • Use the toilet by themselves.
  • Put on coats, boots and shoes with minimal assistance.
  • Make choices: red or blue crayon; blocks or dolls.

Bradley Strait, principal at The Learning Community, a pre-K through grade 2 school in the Broadalbin-Perth Central School District, recommends making incremental changes toward Independence

“Set your child up for success,” he said. “Instead of letting them pick an outfit from their whole wardrobe –and risk them picking shorts when it’s snowing outside – lay out two weather-appropriate outfits and let them choose which one to wear.”

2. Read together

Children have to learn to read before they can read to learn. Learning the alphabet is the first step.

  • Sing the alphabet song together.
  • Point to written letters as you sing.
  • Point out the letters in your child’s name.
  • Choose books about your child’s interests.
  • Visit your local library and let your child choose books to read with you.

3. Count together

Recognizing numbers and understanding their relationship to one another is a basic foundational math skill.

  • Count steps together while you walk up and down a flight of stairs.
  • Count pieces of cereal or crackers as you put them in a bowl (or as you eat them!).
  • Ask your child “how many?” when you see groups of items that number fewer than 10.
  • Practice sorting and classifying—big, small, near, far, under, above, colors— as a way to reinforce early math skills.

4. Look for social opportunities

In preschool and kindergarten, children are learning social skills such as sharing, communicating and listening. Look for opportunities for your child to practice.

  • Make playdates.
  • Go to library story times.
  • Visit local playgrounds.

5. Establish—or reinforce—routines

Help your child become accustomed to routines by establishing a set of activities to do every morning upon waking and every evening before bedtime.

  • Get dressed.
  • Brush teeth after meals.
  • Put dirty clothes in a laundry hamper.
  • Read before bed.

6. Engage your child in conversation

A three-year-old might not yet have a robust vocabulary, but they can still express their needs, wants, hopes and fears in their own way. And the more you talk with them, the more words they will learn.

  • How do you feel?
  • Why do you like this toy?
  • Why are you scared?

Why is pre-K and kindergarten important?

Children benefit from early-education programs, like prekindergarten or kindergarten, because they learn academic and social skills that lay a solid foundation for the rest of their years in school. Kids who attend early-education programs receive higher reading, math and cognition test scores into early adulthood and earn more money over the course of their lifetime compared with those who did not have the benefit of early education.

Is my child not ready for school—or is it something else?

If you have questions about what your child should be able to do at their age, speak with your child’s pediatrician, call the early intervention office in your county or contact the school for support. The sooner kids get the help they need, the sooner they’ll be able to thrive at school.

So your child will be going to school!

Whether it’s preschool or kindergarten that your child will be attending, change can be unsettling for everyone involved. Before school starts, there are a few things parents should know and can do to help ease their family into a new school routine.

Visit the school

The more time your child spends at the school they’ll attend—especially with you—the more comfortable they’ll be when they start attending school by themselves.

  • Arrange a tour at your local elementary school or early learning center.
  • Attend concerts or other public events that interest your child at the school.
  • Play on the playground.

Know the rules

It’s true: Schools have lots of rules and policies, all geared toward ensuring a safe and healthy environment for students and staff. Check out school handbooks or websites to be familiar with rules that you know will impact your family, such as:

  • Pick-up and drop-off times and locations.
  • Parking.
  • Food for classroom parties/birthdays.
  • Safety policies, such as propping doors open.
  • Visitor and volunteer rules and policies.

Attendance matters

Regular attendance builds the school-going habit and helps children develop relationships with teachers and school staff. But there are other reasons daily, on-time attendance is important.

  • Teachers schedule their time in the classroom to the minute; late arrivals can disrupt learning and distract other students.
  • Early grades lay the foundation for future learning, and regular attendance helps children develop the reading, writing and math skills they will need in the future.
  • If your child says they don’t want to go to school, talk to your child’s teacher as soon as possible—you might be able to help address a small issue before it becomes a big problem.

Teamwork works

Once you’ve made the decision to enroll your child in school, think of their teacher and school as a partner. You all have the same goal for your child: to be happy and successful.

Talk with your child about what’s happening in their world away from home and take advantage of the many ways schools share information with families.

  • Parent-teacher conferences.
  • Parent-teacher organizations or school community councils.
  • Read through papers sent home.
  • Check out teacher and/or school websites, if they have one.
  • Find out how your child’s teacher prefers to communicate: email, phone, text message app.

Remember, you’re all in this together. If there is something happening at home or school that you think is, or could, negatively affect your child, let their teacher know. They can’t help if they aren’t aware. They can work with you and your child to find solutions or accommodations to make school a positive place were your child can learn and grow.

Future nutritionists, botanists emerge at LES

In an effort to empower children to make healthy food choices, develop an awareness of how fruits and vegetables are grown, and increase physical activity, Liberty Elementary School teacher Christy Green joined forces with our friend Bee Moser from Cornell Cooperative Extension to offer an exciting extra-curricular class for all second graders.

Fun, engaging and undoubtedly educational, the class featured a perfect mix of structure and informality. Students were happy to share their personal healthy pursuits, from making an apple pie with mom using fresh apples from the yard to trying – and enjoying – a chickpea from the school’s salad bar.

The goal of the 60 minute class was to teach students about the parts of a plant by focusing on the different parts that we commonly eat – root, stem, seed, flower, fruit, and leaf. Following a brief discussion, students put their knowledge to the test in a game that called for students to match a fruit or vegetable with the part of the plant it is known as. (For example, a carrot is a root, celery is a stem, corn is a seed, broccoli is a flower, etc.)

Together, Ms. Green and Ms. Moser hosted a healthy taste test.  Students were asked to describe size, shape, color, smell and texture of the food before taking a bite. As an added charm school-esque bonus, students learned the importance of a “no thank you bite” and how to discreetly dispose of a food they don’t like using a napkin.

After planting kale seeds in an  ice cream cone (because it’s compostable), students ended the class with a little exercise.

Importance notice regarding give back days

When snow/inclement weather days are not used, the district “gives them back” by closing school on days that were originally scheduled to have school in session. Although Liberty Central School District has ten days snow days built into the calendar for the 2018-19 school year, as of March 14, we have used four.

While no one can accurately predict what the winter has in store for us, at this point it seems likely that we will not require all of the remaining snow days.

Read below to review the district’s plan to give back this year’s unused snow days.

  • School will be closed on Friday, March 22.

If the district does not use any additional snow days by April 12, the following days would also become give back days:

  • Tuesday, April 23
  • Wednesday, April 24
  • Friday, May 24
  • Thursday, May 23
  • Friday, May 17

Please note that in the event that additional snow/inclement weather days are used during the remainder of the school year, some of the dates listed above will have to remain as regular school days and your child will need to be in attendance at school. Additional information will be sent home to parents and posted to the district’s website if changes are made.

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