HS Course Descriptions

ART

Studio Art

A required foundation course in Studio Art designed to develop a visual and aesthetic awareness, while exploring a wide variety of media and developing basic skills. The emphasis will be on two-dimensional work, although the class will explore some three-dimensional media. Areas to be included are design; perspective; sketching and renderings in pencil; painting; and an introduction to the basics of sculpture using clay and other materials. The class will incorporate exposure to major movements in art into the studio experience.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Advanced Studio in Art – A and B

Advanced Studio will follow and build upon skills and knowledge acquired in Studio in Art. The class offered two cumulative semesters of exploration in two-dimensional and three-dimensional work. Areas of exploration may include drawing, painting, graphics, design, construction, basic sculpture, and mixed media projects. The students will produce works suitable for inclusion in portfolios. It is required that students take both semesters.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Ceramics 1 – A and B

Two cumulative semesters of Ceramics offer an introduction to clays, glazes, and various surface treatments, while developing knowledge of the relationship of form and function. Emphasis is on hand-built forms as well as wheel-thrown forms. Students design, construct, and finish projects and learn to comment on their work.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and successful completion of the first semester
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½

Ceramics 2 – A and B

This Advanced Ceramics course offers two cumulative semesters in which students will continue to explore selected styles and techniques of working with clays, glazes, and additional surface treatments. This course places greater emphasis on combined forms of wheel-thrown and hand-built pieces.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art/Studio in Ceramics and successful completion of the first semester
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½

Drawing and Painting 1 – A and B/Drawing and Painting 2 – A and B

This course offering consists of two cumulative semesters in which students will explore various techniques of drawing using different media, surfaces, and styles. This course will carry drawing into paintings using watercolor, tempera, acrylic, inks, and combinations of media. Students will produce works suitable for inclusion in portfolios. Students may be involved in school and community-wide mural projects.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and successful completion of the first semester
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½

Graphics Design 1 – A and B

This year long course explores Graphic layout, design skills, advertising techniques and developing an artistic voice through digital media. Some 3 D work is included but primarily, students work in PhotoShop as their canvas.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and successful completion of the first semester
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½ each

Graphics 2 – A and B

Students will pursue projects in specific graphic media of their own choosing as well as teacher driven assignments and will develop their expertise in these areas. This course places emphasis on major projects suitable for inclusion in portfolios.

  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art, Computer Graphics 1 and successful completion of the first semester
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½ each

Photography 1 – A and B

Photography 1 is an introduction to developing the eye, the technique and the heart of a photographer, combining technical and creative skill. Students will learn how to use their or a school camera to complete varied assignments. This course will teach composition, theory, and visual literacy along with technical skills. **Additional time outside of the class is required along with participation and attendance at shows.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½

Photography 2 – A and B

In this advanced level of Photography using digital media, students will use the knowledge and skills developed in Photography 1. The student will develop major projects in concentrated areas. The student may produce works suitable for inclusion in portfolios. As in Studio in Photograph 1, there is a cost factor for flash drives and paper. Students may take this course for college credit.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and Studio in Photography I
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½ each

Photography 3 – A and B

Photography 3 – A and B is a more advanced year of portfolio development where half of the assignments are student driven. Students may take this course for college credit.

  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and Studio in Photography 2 and permission of instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½ each

Video Production

This course is an introduction to speaking through digital video. Students will learn how to organize shots prior to shooting, aesthetically produce work, and deliver messages through the media. The will introduce the proper use of technology to capture and edit the works including camera use, lighting, and sound recording. Students will capture and produce works for school activities after school hours as well.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Art – Independent Study

This course is mainly for Art majors. Permission of the instructor is required. The objective of this course is to allow students to make use of their knowledge of design and develop their aesthetic abilities by in-depth study in a particular area of interest. The individual student and the instructor will develop criteria and expectations on a one-to-one basis. The student may repeat Independent Study.

  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Studio in Art and permission of instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks each
  • Credits: ½ each

BUSINESS

Accounting

This course offering is a full-year course that provides students with a general understanding of proper recordkeeping procedures used in business and for personal use. This course will contrast procedures used by a service business with that of a merchandising business in addition to the differences of a business organized as a sole proprietorship and a partnership. Students will learn how to maintain the daily financial records of a business, prepare and interpret financial statements, and record and process a payroll. Students will complete at least two business simulation projects throughout the course. Students may use a calculator.

  • Grade: 10-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: 1

Financial Accounting – SCCC

This is a college level course through Sullivan County Community College that provides students with a general understanding of proper recordkeeping procedures used in business and for personal use. This course will contrast procedures used by a service business with that of a merchandising business in addition to the differences of a business organized as a sole proprietorship and a partnership. Students will learn how to maintain the daily financial records of a business, prepare and interpret financial statements, and record and process a payroll. Students will complete at least two business simulation projects throughout the course. Students may use a calculator.

  • Grade: 10-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: 1 high school credit and 3 college credits (with tuition payment)

Business Computer Applications

This is a college level course through Sullivan County Community College. Students learn to use productivity software and application packages in the Windows operating environment. The applications covered include word processing, spreadsheets, presentation and database software. This is an ideal course for the college-bound student or a student entering the world of work! This course will introduce you to word processing, database, spreadsheet, presentations, and internet skills and their uses as tools for success at the college level and subsequently, at work.

  • Grade: 10-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Final Examination/Project
  • Credits: ½ high school credit and 3 college credits (with tuition payment)

Business Law

This one-year course gives the student a solid understanding of law in American business as well as some insight into criminal law. The student will concentrate on areas such as contracts, using credit, working for others, loss protection, using commercial paper, understanding real property, and business organizations. The course offers valuable practical suggestions on preventing common legal difficulties. Students need to be conscientious with the assigned work in order to enjoy the knowledge they are gathering. The student will expand vocabulary and sharpen abilities to think analytically and systematically. Students can use this course as a fifth unit for a Social Studies sequence.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: 1

Business Math

This course is a college level course through Sullivan County Community College. The course covers the mathematics used in everyday business and accounting. Among the topics included are fractions and decimals, the use of algebraic equations, percent’s and their applications, sales and trade discounts, markup, payroll, checking accounts, simple and compound interest, discounting of notes, present value, taxes, and business statistics. In addition to counting as a business credit, this course can also count as the third math credit for any high school student’s graduation requirement.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: 1 high school credit and 3 college credits (with tuition payment)

Career and Financial Management

Career and Financial Management will explore personal financial planning, career planning, money management, consumer purchases and protection, personal banking, credit cards/debts, housing, stocks/bonds, tax preparation, home/vehicle/health insurance, and other types of financial decisions made throughout life.
Hands-on experience will include Internet activities, actual applications, and contact with community businesses and their procedures in regards to personal finances.

  • Grade: 10-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: ½

Entrepreneurship

Students explore the steps necessary to starting a business, including analyzing the market, finding financing, and creating a form of organization that will accommodate future growth. They learn about the operational issues that new businesses face, such as regulations, protecting intellectual property, and the financial risks of starting a business. Students examine ethical issues and develop a framework for managing them. Finally, students identify the risks, returns, and other aspects of entrepreneurship as a potential career.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: ½

Marketing

Students will learn about consumer buying and business selling psychology, product pricing, distribution, and other principles and strategies. This course will also cover retail management, advertising, and careers in the sales and marketing field. This course will apply teamwork and project-based learning strategies used in business.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: 1

Personal Finance

The goal of Personal Finance is to help students to become financially responsible, conscientious members of society. To reach that end, this course develops students understanding and skills in such areas as money management, budgeting, financial goal attainment, the wise use of credit, insurance, investments, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: ½

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized marketing course that develops student understanding of the sport/event industries, their economic impact, and products; distribution systems and strategies; pricing considerations; product/service management, and promotion. Students acquire an understanding and appreciation for planning. Throughout the course, students experience problem-solving situations for which they must apply academic and critical-thinking skills. Participation in cooperative education is an optional instructional method, giving students the opportunity to apply newly acquired marketing skills in the workplace.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Cumulative Test/Project
  • Credits: ½

ENGLISH

English 9 (9 Honors; 9 Regents)

This course builds upon the language arts skills mastered in English 8. The teacher will reinforce reading comprehension skills through study of common core adapted modules. This course focuses on writing that is applicable to common core-based Regents essay tasks. All students will also receive training (via the library) in the research process, particularly as it relates to researching online.

  • Grade: 9
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 8 and teacher final recommendation
  • Length: 40 week
  • Evaluation: Test
  • Credits: 1

English 10 (10 Honors; 10 Regents)

In English 10, students will use the process writing approach to facilitate their writing. This course gives particular attention to vocabulary skills as related to common core Regents-based reading and essay tasks. Students learn to read and interpret (in greater depth) various literary genres using adapted common core modules. This course incorporates listening and speaking units to the writing program, as is recommended in CCLS. This course makes a special effort to prepare the students for the common core Regents exam.

  • Grade: 10
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 9 and teacher final recommendation
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Evaluation: Test (based on the Regents Exam)
  • Credits: 1

English 11 (11 Honors; 11 Regents)

Reading skills in literature are further refined. This course fosters literary analysis and criticism. Readings will include materials adapted from common core modules, with an emphasis on advanced critical thinking skills. This course also highlights non-fiction as is relevant to common core Regents reading and essay tasks. Tests are writing intensive in preparation for the Regents exam. In addition, oral presentations are required to fulfill CCLS. Students learn test-taking techniques for the SAT, ACT, and the common core Regents examination.

  • Grade: 11
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 10 and teacher final recommendation
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Evaluation: Regents Exam
  • Credits: 1

English 11 Honors/Advanced Placement English

This is a college-level course. It is an intensive preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in Literature and/or Language and Composition (a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the test may translate to college credit). The course consists of: (1) intensive reading comprehensive practice; (2) familiarizing students with literary terms and concepts; (3) readings of high-quality literature; and (4) intensive essay writing. In short, the course is rigorous preparation for the AP exam and the common core Regents exam. Summer reading (prior to the start of the course in September) is required.

  • Grade: 11
  • Prerequisites: Demonstrated excellence in English 10 and teacher recommendation
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: AP exam
  • Credits: 3 college credits

Cinema

This is a half-year senior elective. This course treats films as literature, and requires students to make evidence-based claims about individual films. Essays are also required at the conclusion of each Focus (unit) in which connections are made between films and conclusions are drawn using evidence. Critical thinking skills are developed. A project or research paper is required for the final exam.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 11
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Evaluation: Test
  • Credits: ½

Composition 1 (College-level Effective Writing)

Students will draft and revise college-level essays in this writing-intensive course. Students will study the conventions of academic prose, examine various methods of organization and development, and learn research skills. A research paper serves as the final exam.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 8-11 and a score of 78 or higher on the English Regents
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½ high school credit, 3 college credits

Effective Writing

This is a half-year English course designed for both college and non-college bound seniors. Students will write a number of pieces designed to prepare them for life beyond high school. The course emphasizes effective written communication and mechanics including spelling, usage, paragraphing, etc.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of English 11
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Evaluation: written works
  • Credits: ½

Fundamentals of Speech

This course provides public speaking training and practice.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of English 8-11
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½ high school credit, 3 college credits

English AIS

This program in reading and/or writing provides supplementary instruction for those students whose test scores indicate a need for small group or individualized instruction to perform better in the content areas and to meet successfully the requirements of the English Regents exam. The non-credit program in writing is required for those students who score a one or two on their ELA exam or who fail the Preliminary or Regents Competency Test in Writing. Instruction focuses on all aspects of the writing process as determined by individual needs with special emphasis on skills needed to pass the English Regents exam. Student placement into AIS occurs with teacher recommendation. Improving test scores and classroom performance, and/or passing the English Regents Exam, allows students to exit from the program.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: As stated above
  • Length: As needed
  • Credits: None

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Students must obtain one credit of study in a second language by the end of grade 9 in order to meet the NYS requirement for graduation. Those students who pass IA, IB and the BOCES Proficiency at the end of grade 8 will receive one high school credit.

Spanish Exploratory Foreign Language

Spanish Exploratory is a one-year course, which introduces the Spanish language and culture. Students practice the four language skills – listening, speaking, reading, and writing – with an emphasis on vocabulary and pronunciation. Students will survey aspects of the history, culture, geography, and daily life in Spanish speaking countries. The introductory nature of the course permits students to become acquainted with Spanish and to strengthen skills in the acquisition of this language. Students who take this course are not eligible to continue taking Spanish.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: For students who fail Spanish 1A, IB or the BOCES proficiency exam.
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Spanish II

The basic skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) continue with increased emphasis on reading and idiomatic writing and more opportunity for original expression. The introduction of additional tenses occurs with more advanced grammar studied in depth. The teacher will revisit some topics from Spanish 1 with additional vocabulary and the use of more sophisticated concepts.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Spanish I and the BOCES Proficiency
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Evaluation: Local Exam
  • Credits: 1

Spanish III (Regents)

The teacher will stress the continued use of aural and oral Spanish. More writing and composition are included. The teacher will emphasize considerable vocabulary build-up through reading and discussion. The introduction and drilling of advanced points of grammar will also occur. The student must take a BOCES Regents exam upon completion of this course. Students must pass both the course and the Regents in order to receive credit for the course.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish II
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Evaluation: BOCES Regents exam (Speaking portion of the Spanish Regents exam is given 10 days prior to the written exam)
  • Credits: 1

Spanish IV

The fourth year of language provides more intense reading practice, using texts, supplements (novels, articles), and other works by native writers. Oral class discussion of the reading is expected and an advanced grammar review is offered through exercises and composition, often in the form of critiques, reports, readings, or essay tests based on class projects and extra class readings.

  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish III
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Local final exam or a project
  • Credits: 1

Spanish V

This course offers grammar, reading, and essay writing that is more advanced with stress on vocabulary build-up and discussion in Spanish. Materials and readings will be geared toward an Advanced Placement level of study. After the first six weeks of class, students must indicate to the teacher whether they plan to commit to the AP exam. Those who do will continue to prepare by way of readings, speaking, writing, and listening practice. The others will continue to work at the advanced level of study but will take a school exam only upon completion of the course.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish IV
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Local final exam or a/project
  • Credits: 1

Spanish – Independent Study

This course is an agreement between the teacher and the student to take a Spanish course on an independent basis because of scheduling conflicts that prevent the student from enrolling in a class. The teacher, parent/guardian, school counselor, and the building administration must approve independent study courses. The school counselor will keep the agreement on file. The teacher will report grades on a regular basis to coincide with the marking periods (See the General Information for independent study courses.

MATHEMATICS

Advanced Algebra

The high school offers this course at Liberty Central School through Sullivan County Community College. Students will learn about polynomials, radicals, trigonometry of right triangles, Laws of Sine and Cosine, and the following types of functions: linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry with at least 1 passed Regents exam
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: College Final
  • Credits: 1 high school and 4 college credits
  • Next Course: Algebra 2 or Math with Financial Applications

Algebra 1A

Algebra 1A is the first year of the revised Common Core Mathematics curriculum. This course is half of a two-year program that will culminate in the passing of the Algebra 1 regent’s exam. Students will receive an introduction to the world of algebra. The teacher will stress functions and their notation throughout the year. Included in this course will be a review of all operations with polynomials, solving multi-step equations, with an emphasis on real world applications of the algebra, manipulating expressions and open sentences, and factoring binomials and trinomials. The teacher will address solving quadratic equations by factoring and completing the square. Students will perform graphing linear, exponential, absolute value, and quadratic functions. The class will explore solving systems of inequalities and equations using several different methods. The class will explore operations on algebraic fractions. Students will produce stem and leaf, box-and-whisker, scatter plots, lines of best fit, and histograms for statistical data. The class will explore quartiles, percentiles, and standard deviation calculations. Problem solving and modeling will be the key strand, which will dominate all lessons. A scientific calculator is required.

  • Grade: 9 – 10
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 8
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Local Final
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Algebra 1B

Algebra 1B

Algebra 1B is the second year of a two-year sequence in Integrated Algebra. This course will assist students in developing skills and processes, using a variety of techniques, to solve problems successfully in a variety of settings. Problem situations may result in all types of linear equations in one variable, quadratic functions with integral coefficients and roots as well as absolute value and exponential functions. Coordinate geometry will be integrated into the investigation of these functions allowing students to make connections between their analytical and geometrical representations. The classroom teacher will present problem situations resulting in systems of equations. The classroom teacher will give alternative solution methods equal value within the strategies used for problem solving. Measurement within a problem-solving context will include calculating rates using appropriate units and converting within measurement systems. Students will study data analysis including measures of central tendency and visual representations of data. The classroom teacher will develop an understanding of correlation and causation and will use reasonable lines of best fit to make predictions. Students will solve problem situations requiring right triangle Trigonometry. The students will use elementary probability theory to determine the probability of events including independent, dependent, and mutually exclusive events. A scientific calculator is required for this course.

  • Grade: 10 – 11
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1A
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Algebra Regents
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Geometry or Math with Financial Applications

Algebra 1

Algebra 1 is the first year of the revised New York State Math curriculum. This one-year course will introduce students to the world of algebra. This includes a review of all operations with polynomials, solving multi-step equations with an emphasis on real world applications of algebra, manipulating expressions and open sentences, and factoring binomials and trinomials. Students will explore graphing and solving systems or inequalities and equations using several different methods. The class will explore linear, quadratic, absolute values, and exponential graphs. Students will also examine and produce linear regressions, statistical data, and statistical graphs. Problem solving will be a key strand and will dominate all lessons. A scientific calculator is required for this course.

  • Grade: 9
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 8
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Algebra Regents
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Geometry

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 is the third Regents level course in the new mathematics sequence. In order to obtain an advanced regents diploma, students must successfully complete this course and regents exam. Topics covered will include solving rational, radical, quadratic, and absolute value equations and inequalities, recognition of conic section equations, transformations, functions and relations, composition and inverse functions, Trigonometric functions and their graphs, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, Trigonometric applications and identities, complex numbers, statistics, sequences and series, regressions, and probability. Students will use graphing calculators to enhance instruction. A scientific calculator is required.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Geometry and passing the Geometry Regents
  • Final Evaluation: June Regents
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Pre-calculus

Calculus

The high school offers the calculus course at Liberty Central School through Sullivan County Community College. Upon successful completion of this class, the student will be able to:

  • solve problems with limit
  • demonstrate use of various rules of differentiation
  • integrate expressions using appropriate integration rules
  • solve problems involving rate of change
  • solve optimization problems
  • find areas between curves and volumes using integration
  • demonstrate graphing with the help of techniques from calculus, and
  • integrate and differentiate natural log functions and exponential functions.
  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Sullivan County Community College Exam
  • Credits: 1 high school and 4 college credits
  • Next course: Classes at SCCC

Geometry

Geometry is a one-year course. Students will have the opportunity to make conjectures about geometric situations and prove in a variety of ways, both formal and informal, that their conclusion follows logically from their hypothesis. This course will employ an integrated approach to the study of geometric relationships. Integrating synthetic, transformational, and coordinate approaches to geometry, students will justify geometric relationships and properties of geometric figures. Congruence and similarity of triangles will be established using appropriate theorems. The classroom teacher will use transformations including rotations, reflections, translations, and glide reflections and coordinate geometry to establish and verify geometric relationships. A major emphasis of this course is to allow students to investigate geometric situations. Properties of triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles should receive particular attention. Students will use the traditional tools of compass and straightedge as well as dynamic geometry software that model these tools more efficiently and accurately, to assist in these investigations. Geometry will lead students to an understanding that reasoning and proof are fundamental aspects of mathematics and something that sets it apart from the other sciences.

  • Grade: 10
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 or Algebra 1A and Algebra IB
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Geometry Regents
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Algebra 2 (only with a passing Geometry Regents grade, or SCCC Advanced Algebra, or Math w/ Financial Applications).

Math with Financial Applications

Math with Financial Applications is a one-year math class taken upon completion of Algebra 1A and 1B. This class offers a student one more year of math and prepares him or her for the dynamics of math outside of school. The class deals with various consumer topics, such as banking and mortgages, budgeting, income taxes, types of loans and the result of borrowing, buying verses renting, insurance costs, payroll data, investments, and other real life applications of mathematics.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1A and 1B
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Pre-Calculus

The offering of the pre-calculus course at Liberty Central School is through Sullivan County Community College. Pre-Calculus consists of advanced algebra with a pre-calculus approach. The class will explore all of the Trigonometric functions and students will transform their graphs in the coordinate plane. Topics that will be covered are solving higher degree polynomials, mathematical modeling, applications in linear and angular velocities, linear programming, rational and exponential functions and their graphs, polar coordinates and equations, graphs of polar equations, powers and roots of complex numbers, conic sections, matrices, sequences and series, mathematical induction, and other topics as time permits. Because of the explorative nature of this course, the teacher will introduce many areas of math. The use of the TI-83 plus calculator will incorporate into almost all phases of this class.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 2 and a passing grade on the Algebra 2 Regents
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: College final
  • Credits: 1 high school and 4 college credits
  • Next course: College Calculus

Math AIS

Students receive Academic Intervention Services (AIS) if they will benefit from additional support outside of the regularly scheduled math courses. Students’ placement in AIS occurs because students did not meet state mandated standards on the eighth grade math assessment or failed a required Regents exam. Students may exit AIS after they have obtained an 80% on the school final or a passing grade on the Integrated Algebra Regents.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Unsuccessful on a state math exam
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: None
  • Credits: 0
  • Next Course: None

Pre-Algebra (Self-Contained)

Pre-Algebra (Self-Contained) is the first year of the revised Common Core Mathematics curriculum. This course is half of a two-year program that will culminate in the passing of the Algebra 1 regent’s exam. The teacher will introduce students to the world of algebra. The teacher will stress functions and their notation throughout the year. Included in this course will be a review of all operations with polynomials, solving multi-step equations, with an emphasis on real world applications of the algebra, manipulating expressions and open sentences, and factoring binomials and trinomials. The teacher will address solving quadratic equations by factoring and completing the square. Graphing linear, exponential, absolute value, and quadratic functions will be performed. The class will explore solving systems of inequalities and equations using several different methods. The class will explore operations on algebraic fractions. The students will produce stem and leaf, box-and-whisker, scatter plots, lines of best fit, and histograms for statistical data. The class will explore quartiles, percentiles, and standard deviation calculations. Problem solving and modeling will be the key strand, which will dominate all lessons. A scientific calculator is required.

  • Grade: 9 – 10
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 8
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Local Final
  • Credits: 1
  • Next Course: Algebra 1B

Elementary Statistics

The offering of the elementary statistics course at Liberty Central School is through Sullivan County Community College. Students learn about probability, frequency distributions, mean and standard deviation, the binomial distribution, the normal distribution, hypothesis testing, samples from a finite population, regression and correlation, confidence intervals, and chi-square tests.

  • Grade: 11-12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry and a passing grade on one Regents exam
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: College Final
  • Credits: 1 high school and 3 college credits
  • Next Course: Advanced Algebra or Algebra 2 (with 2 passing Regents grades) or Math with Financial Applications

MUSIC

Mixed Chorus

The mixed chorus meets every other day, 2-3 periods per week. This course allows students in grades 9-12 to participate in a varied program of study in vocal music. The Students will learn vocalization with emphasis on breathing, tone, projection, diction, balance, and sight-reading. Students will examine and perform a variety of styles, both sacred and secular, throughout the year. The mixed chorus is the largest vocal group and the membership is required to perform in the annual winter, pops, and spring concerts. Additional performance opportunities may arise which will also be required. Students are required to have a formal range check, with the vocal director, within the first week of the semester. Students are also required to attend on vocal lesson each week to improve singing technique and musicianship skills. Specific grade criteria distributed at the start of the semester.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful participation in the MS choral program or Permission of instructor
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Honors Chorus

This group meets every day in conjunction with mixed chorus and provides an opportunity for a more advanced choral experience. The students will explore and perform a more challenging choral literature. Students in Honors are required to attend a weekly vocal lesson. In addition, honors chorus students are required to perform a NYSSMA solo. We will base the students’ selection to honors chorus on vocal ability, group needs, and level of maturity. Specific grade criteria distributed at the start of the course.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation only
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Symphonic Band

This performance-oriented class consists of all students in the LCHS bands. It is the core of the band program. This group studies, reads, and performs the wealth of literature for large wind and percussion groups. Students will experience the classics (Bach, Mozart) and modem band works, as well as Broadway and Pop styles. This group performs in at least three concerts per year. Performances at State or National Festivals will receive consideration, based upon readiness of the group. The teacher will give periodic quizzes and performance evaluations. A weekly lesson is provided and is required as part of the course. All symphonic band students participate in the LCHS Marching Band as part of their course requirement. Public performances are also a required part of this course.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Experience on a wind or percussion instrument or permission of band director and director of music
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Honors Band (Wind Ensemble)

This class provides a vehicle for those students with advanced performance skills. While all Wind Ensemble members are required to participate in the Symphonic Band, on the alternate days we will explore more advanced wind and percussion literature. Works of more of a soloist nature are studied and each member must play independently. Students will be sight-reading on a regular basis, learning how to conduct, singing, and studying advanced theory-history concepts. Quizzes, performance evaluations, and a final exam will determine a student’s final grade. Festival competition/adjudication will be included as part of the group experience. Public performances are a required part of the course.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Recommendations of the band director and director of music based upon instrumentation needs and student readiness.
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Orchestra

Orchestra gives a large ensemble experience to all string students in grades 9-12. Students will explore many different styles of music and will perform them throughout the school year. This class stresses and enforces basic playing components and practice techniques on a regular basis. This ensemble meets every other day.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Honors Orchestra

Honors Orchestra challenges students with more advanced repertoire, usually of NYSSMA level 5 or 6. Selection for this group is based on a rating of 90 or above on a Level 5 or Level 6 NYSSMA solo and the instrumental needs of the group. Prior approval and permission of the director are required before becoming part of this ensemble. Other components for selection include ability to follow directions, working well with others, a positive attitude, work ethic, and past performance history. The director has the final choice of a student’s eligibility for selection to this ensemble! This ensemble meets every other day.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Jazz Ensemble

Many people consider Jazz to be America’s first art form. Students, who have proficiency on a Jazz Ensemble instrument (saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, guitar, bass, drum set) and can read music, may choose this elective. This course will introduce students to a wide variety of contemporary sounds including swing, jazz-rock, Latin and ballads. Class meets every “A” day. Public performances are a required part of this course.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: achievement of an intermediate level of performance on instruments listed above and enrollment in at least one other music class; approval of Director is also required.
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Music Appreciation 1

This course provides students with the insight into music from the earliest of times to the modem era. Students will be listening, performing, composing, reviewing music fundamentals, and applying their knowledge of music to comment on the different styles of music. Students will begin to understand the importance that the role of music plays in today’s society. The teacher will outline specific course criteria at the beginning of each semester.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Basics of note reading; successful completion of Music 8
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Music Appreciation 2

This course will emphasize popular music in America. We will pay attention to the historical significance of blues, jazz and rock music has had on our society. We will introduce students to various musicians, composers and leaders of those genres. We will spend a good portion of the class on listening to the various styles and being able to understand the complexities and characteristics of each style. Specific course requirements outlined at the start of the semester.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Music Appreciation 1 or permission of the instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Music Theory 1

This course is open to all students in grades 9-12 and meets five times a week for a half year. It will acquaint students with the fundamentals of music theory. The elements covered will include basic notation, aural skills, sight singing, listening, analyzing songs, scales, keys, chords, meter, rhythm, and a brief overview of harmony.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: ability to read music; enrollment in at least one music ensemble
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Music Theory 2

This course is open to all students in grades 9-12 and meets five times a week for a half year. It will continue the foundation laid down by Music Theory 1 with more complexity and application of more advanced techniques. The elements covered will include more advanced notation, aural skills, sight singing, listening, analyzing songs, part writing, keyboard harmony, an introduction to musical dictation, and some aspects of music history.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Music Theory I or exemption by exam; enrollment in at least one music ensemble
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Piano Lab

This course will introduce basic keyboarding skills including chords, scales and playing melodies. Students will develop a greater understanding of musical notation and more fully understand and become aware of aural and visual elements of music (rhythm, melody, and harmony). Daily practice is essential and expected for this class. This class designed for those who have never played piano or have very limited knowledge of the instrument. Specific course requirements outlined at the start of the semester.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of another HS music class or permission of the instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: 1/2

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

Every student who attends school must participate in a physical education program each semester they attend. If a student requires a special or adaptive physical education program, he/she should notify the Director of PE & Health, guidance counselor, school nurse, and PE teacher as soon as possible. A note from the student’s physician will be required stating physical limitations, recommendations, and allowable activities for the student to participate. Students must dress appropriately in order to participate in physical education classes. All students are required to wear sneakers for safety and performance reasons. If a student cannot participate in PE classes for less than a week either due to minor injuries or upon returning to school following an illness, the student must deliver a note from the parent to the physical education teacher. If a student cannot participate in PE for more than a week, that student must deliver a note from his/her physician to the School Nurse. Students must make up all missed classes.

Aerobics

This class introduces the students to aerobics and the benefits of this type of exercise program. Students will have their weight, body fat, and body measurements taken at the beginning of the class and periodically throughout the class. The class will use heart rate monitors as well. Students would also be instructed on how to journal and keep track of their exercising and eating habits. Topics to be covered include introduction to aerobics/floor aerobics, step aerobics, stability ball, yoga/power yoga and Pilates, dance aerobics/line dancing, tae-bo, kickboxing, and interval aerobics. This course will satisfy the physical education credit.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Health

Health is a required 20-week class that students must take during grades 10-12. Health provides an opportunity to help students understand the importance of healthy choices to live a long healthy life. Health encompasses three areas: mental, social, and physical. The emphasis is on health being a matter of individual choices about lifestyles with consequences either positive or negative. The student explores his/her values and the idea of being a responsible, healthy adult where choices can affect the individual, family, friends, and other members of society. The teacher will teach responsibility and respect for self and others throughout the semester.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Evaluation: Homework, projects, tests, and participation
  • Credits: ½

Personal Fitness

This class is an elective course offered in addition to your traditional Physical Education instruction at Liberty High School. The format is similar to your PE classes and it will occur every other school day. Grading is on a 0- 100% system (similar to traditional physical education classes) with emphasis placed on the following:

  • attendance (in compliance with LCS attendance policy)
  • safety progress (effort and tracking of), Testing (knowledge-based)
  • ability to work with others within class confines
  • fitness testing (endurance, upper/lower body strength, flexibility)
  • resistance/weight (anaerobic) training (proper use/instruction of all weight training exercise equipment
  • proper breathing during each exercise)
  • cardiovascular (aerobic) training (proper use/instruction of aerobic training exercise/equipment)
  • strength training vs. endurance (weight loss) training (training for increased muscle mass vs. a lean/tone body; reps/sets/resistance choices; sport-specific training)
  • diet-calories-fat, carbohydrates, protein (maintenance vs. weight gain vs. weight loss diets)
  • human muscular system (skeletal function of muscles and exercise and its effect on these muscles)
  • supplements (are they worth it? cost vs. benefit)
  • anabolic steroids (what are they and what are their medical risks)
  • suggestions from class (we will take the time to research and answer common questions from the students involved in this class)
  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Advanced Personal Fitness

This class is an elective college-level course accredited by SUNY Sullivan and offered in addition to your traditional Physical Education instruction at Liberty High School. The format is similar to your PE classes and it will meet every other school day. Grading is on a 0- 100% system (similar to traditional physical education classes) with emphasis placed on the following:

  • attendance (in compliance with LCS attendance policy)
  • safety progress (effort and tracking of), Testing (knowledge-based)
  • ability to work with others within class confines
  • fitness testing (endurance, upper/lower body strength, flexibility)
  • resistance/weight (anaerobic) training (proper use/instruction of all weight training exercise equipment
  • proper breathing during each exercise)
  • cardiovascular (aerobic) training (proper use/instruction of aerobic training exercise/equipment)
  • strength training vs. endurance (weight loss) training (training for increased muscle mass vs. a lean/tone body; reps/sets/resistance choices; sport-specific training)
  • diet-calories-fat, carbohydrates, protein (maintenance vs. weight gain vs. weight loss diets)
  • human muscular system (skeletal function of muscles and exercise and its effect on these muscles)
  • supplements (are they worth it? cost vs. benefit)
  • anabolic steroids (what are they and what are their medical risks)
  • suggestions from class (we will take the time to research and answer common questions from the students involved in this class)
  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Personal Fitness
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1 high school credit and 1 college credit per semester (with tuition payment)

Physical Education

Physical Education consists of short units of team sports with an emphasis on personal fitness. The participant will be able to use technology to understand their body composition, how to increase cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, and strength. This personal fitness assessment complements self-management and adherence strategies. Strategy and rules comprehension of lifetime sports round out the program.

  • Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physical Education
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: ½

SCIENCE

AP Biology

This course meets every other year for 11th and 12th grade students. Students may take Chemistry, Physics, and/or AP Biology concurrently with Science Department Chairperson permission. The main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology, to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process and to work to prepare those students for the rigors of college courses. The primary emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Therefore, a grasp of science as a process; personal experience in scientific inquiry; recognition of unifying themes that integrate the major topics of biology; application of biological knowledge, analytical skills, and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns will be stressed. Laboratory experience will be the equivalent of those done by college students. Since lab content appears on the AP Exam, students must complete all labs in order to complete the course successfully. Descriptive and experimental laboratory exercises will provide the opportunity for students to learn a variety of skills and those facts, principles, and concepts of general biology covered in lectures, reading, and discussion. This course supports the development of skills such as detailed observation, accurate recording, experimental design and implementation, data interpretation, statistical analysis, formal lab reports, and operation of technical equipment. Students MUST sit for the AP Exam in order to be eligible for a passing grade. The AP Examination usual takes place in mid-May.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry, and Physics
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Chemistry (Regents)

This course meets five days per week for one period with a lab period every other day. Chemistry is the study of matter, the changes in matter, and the mechanics of chemical change. Topics include, but are not limited to, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, radiochemistry, organic chemistry, oxidation-reduction, and kinetics. Chemistry includes a laboratory requirement and submission of lab reports to qualify for the final examination. We strongly recommend this course for college bound students.

  • Grade: 11
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Regents’ Living Environment and Earth Science and enrollment in Algebra 2 and Trigonometry
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: current Regents’ examination in Chemistry Science
  • Credits: 1

General Chemistry I

Chemistry is a branch of science that explores matter and its interactions. General Chemistry I will explore basic chemical concepts, such as Types of Matter, Atomic Structure, the Periodic Table of Elements, Nuclear Chemistry, Bonding, and Energy in Chemical Reactions. Students will also learn the symbols used to describe matter and its changes. The course allows students to develop an understanding of the molecular level and to make connections between it and the substance level.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Living Environment, Earth Science, and Algebra, completion or participation in Geometry is strongly encouraged
  • Length: 20 weeks (Fall only)
  • Final Evaluation : Class Final
  • Credits: 1/2

General Chemistry II

Chemistry is a branch of science that explores matter and its interactions. General Chemistry II will expand on the understanding gained in General Chemistry I and apply it to specific subsections of chemistry. Students will learn about Solutions, Acids, Bases and the pH concept, and Organic Chemistry, with a focus on identifying different organic classes of compounds, as well as organic reactions. The topics in this second course will lay the foundation for students who are interested in career in the medical field.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: the successful completion of General Chemistry I is a must, successful completion of Living Environment, Earth Science, and Algebra, completion or participation in Geometry is strongly encouraged
  • Length: 20 weeks (Spring only)
  • Final Evaluation: Class Final
  • Credits: 1/2

Earth Science (Regents)

Classes of high school Earth Science meet every day for one period and every other day there is one period of lab. Specific course content covers the four major branches of Earth Science: astronomy, geology, oceanography and meteorology. Within these major branches, some sub-topics covered include earth’s motions, energy and its exchange in the atmosphere, rock formation, geologic history, water and climate, landscape development, and environmental change.

  • Grade: 10
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Living Environment
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Regents
  • Credits: 1

Living Environment – Biology (Regents)

The five important themes of the Living Environment – Biology are:

  1. Evolution – How has Earth become populated by the millions of different species we see today?
  2. Energy, matter and organization – What are the parts that make up living things, how are they kept together, and how do living things get energy they need to organize and maintain these parts?
  3. Maintaining a dynamic equilibrium – How does an organism keep conditions inside itself constant in a changing environment?
  4. Reproduction, growth, and development – How is heredity information passed on from parents to offspring?
  5. Interaction and interdependence – How do living things affect and depend on each other and their environment?

Classes of high school Living Environment meet every day for one period and every other day they meet for two periods. Laboratory work must be successfully completed and lab reports submitted in order to qualify for the Regents examination.

  • Grade: 9
  • Prerequisites: completion of 8th grade science; accelerated students take Living Environment in 8th grade based on teacher recommendations; must have a minimum of a 90% average in Science in 7th grade and must be enrolled in Accelerated Math
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: Regents
  • Credits: 1

Environmental Science/Earth Science Perspective

Environmental Science is the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment. Environmental Science I will focus on select topics in this area of Biology, including: Earth’s history, a review of major concepts from Earth Science, fossilization, evolution, weather, as well as the forces that affect the earth and its Biomes. The class is designed to expose the student to various environmental science fields, through hands on experimentation, research, writing, reading, and use of the Internet. The course allows students to develop skills of observation and helps to hone abilities of data interpretation and judgment of information sources. The course allows the opportunity to meet with professionals in various environmental fields, and allows the students to design and conduct independent research.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Living Environment and Earth Science
  • Length: 20 weeks (Fall only)
  • Final Evaluation: Class Final
  • Credits: ½

Environmental Science/Living Environment Perspective

Environmental Science is the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment. Environmental Science II will focus on select topics in this area of Biology, including: Ecological interactions, Evolution, Zoology, Botany/ Dendrology, Forestry, classification and identification, Taxonomy, Aquatic Resources and studies, environmental careers, human impact-as well as resource management. The class is designed to expose the student to various environmental science fields, through hands on experimentation, research, writing, reading, and use of the Internet. The course allows students to develop skills of observation and helps to hone abilities of data interpretation and judgment of information sources. The course allows the opportunity to meet with professionals in various environmental fields, and allows the students to design and conduct independent research.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Living Environment and Earth Science
  • Length: 20 weeks (Spring only)
  • Final Evaluation: Class Final
  • Credits: ½

Physics (Regents)

This course includes the study of the broad concepts involved in the fields of Mechanics, Waves, Electricity and Atomic Theory with special emphasis on the energy exchanges that occur in each area. There is a mandatory laboratory requirement of at least two periods per week spent doing experiments and the submission of a formal report for each experiment. Labs must be successfully completed in order to take the Regents examination. This course is strongly recommended for college-bound students.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Prerequisites: successful completion Regents level Chemistry; Completion of Algebra 2 and Trigonometry
  • Final Evaluation: Regents
  • Credits: 1

Physics of Toys

Students of science should do more than memorize definitions and formulas. To make sense of science, students must be given opportunities to make connections between scientific phenomena and their own world. This class delves into the mysteries of such toys as the Push-n-Go, bottle rockets, paper airplanes, ‘Operation’, and Mousetrap. The students will experience the minds-on, hands-on learning that will improve their problem-solving skills while also improving their science content knowledge.

  • Grade: 11 and 12
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of The Living Environment and Earth Science classes
  • Credits: ½

Forensics

Forensic science is a multidisciplinary science, which includes concepts in many areas including biology, chemistry, zoology, anatomy, genetics, physics, math and statistics, earth science, sociology, psychology, and communications. Topics for this half-year course may include: types of evidence, evidence collection, fingerprints, and impressions, DNA evidence, blood and blood spatter, drug testing, handwriting analysis, muscle and bone analysis, and time of death. Students may not enroll in Forensics if they enroll in the Public Safety program at SC BOCES due to an overlap in curriculum.

Class requirements:

  1. Students must maintain a notebook, which will include all tests, quizzes, labs, complete notes, homework and any additional information, in chronological order.
  2. Each student must present to the class two major projects. Most work will be done independently. Computer access is necessary.
  3. Students must have the ability to work independently as well as within groups.
  4. Every Friday a detailed summary on advancements in forensic science is required.
  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Earth Science and Living Environment
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

SOCIAL STUDIES

Global History and Geography – 9 and 9H

The first part of a two-year study of Global History and Geography contains five units of study. The first unit focuses on an introduction to the methods of social sciences: history, geography, economics, political science and culture. The second unit covers the period from Early Man (4000 BC) to the end of the Classical Civilizations (500 AD). It includes the rise and fall of Great Empires and the emergence and spread of belief systems: Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese philosophies, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The third unit focuses on Expanding Zones of Change and Encounter (500 AD to 1200 AD). The next unit explores the Global Interactions that include Japan, China, and the emerging European countries. The final unit of study introduces the First Global Age (1450 to 1770), which concentrates on the rise of Meso-American Empires and the encounter between people of the Americas, Africa, and Asia.

  • Grade: 9
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 8th grade social studies; placement in Honors based on 8th grade performance and teacher recommendation
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Global History and Geography – 10 and 10H

The second part of a two-year study of Global History and Geography begins with the Age of Revolution (1750 to 1914), which includes the Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, and the Political, Social, and Economic Revolutions. The next unit covers the Crisis and Achievement of the Global World (1900 to 1945). This unit explores the impact of technology, and the causes and effects of the major World Wars. The third unit presents the 20th century since 1945. The last unit of study focuses on Global Connections and Interactions: economic trends, modernization, urbanization, global migration, science and technology, the environment, poverty, international terrorism, women’s emerging role and human rights. Students are required to pass a Regents examination in June in order to meet graduation requirements.

  • Grade: 10
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 9th grade social studies; students in Honors must be in 9H and must maintain an 85 average
  • Credits: 1

United States History and Government – 11 and 11H

The history of the United States is the history of a great experiment in democracy. The basic principles set down by the Declaration of Independence became the guiding ideals underlying the nation’s development. Our history has encompassed a continual search for ways in which to apply these principles. The United States Constitution was a major step toward codifying the principles, but as the history of our country clearly shows, the document represented only the first step in achieving “justice and equality for all”.

The 11th grade U.S. History and Government course is a one-year course. This syllabus divides American history into six general areas. It attempts to relate the past events with the present and future civic lives of the students. The basic social science tools such as the historical method, simple economic analysis, and a study of the political and social institutions are employed. Concepts and understandings are built upon those developed in previous grades.

The student will examine major issues in a depth consistent with their backgrounds and intellectual capacities. This course should help to deepen their respect for the fundamental American values of respect for the individual regardless of one’s background, equality before the law, belief in a government of laws (not of men), and the obligation of all for responsible participation as citizens in the community and nation.

The six general areas are: Constitutional Foundations (Colonial Era to 1865), United States Industrialization (1865 to 1900), The Progressive Movement (1900 to 1920), Prosperity and Depression (1917 to 1940), The U.S. in an Age of Global Crises (1933 to 1960), and A World in Uncertain Times (1960 to the present). Students are required to pass a Regents examination given in June in order to meet requirements for graduation.

  • Grade: 11
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 10th grade social studies; placement in Honors based on 10th grade performance and teacher recommendation
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1

Economics and Economic Decision Making – 12 and 12H

This one-semester course is designed to provide students with the economic knowledge and skills that will enable them to function as informed and economically literate citizens in our society and in the world. Emphasis is given to rational decision-making rather than consumer education, although this emphasis will encourage students to become wiser consumers as well as better citizens.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic economic concepts such as scarcity, supply and demand, markets, productivity, opportunity cost, specialization, productive resources, interdependence, growth and economic systems. Students will also come to understand the operation of the economic system of the United States. Instruction will include discussing the roles of various components of American economic systems, the interdependence of the world economies, the political and social impact of economic decisions, and the economic impact of political and social decisions.

The units in economics include the following: Introduction to Economic Systems, Elements of the Economy (Microeconomics), Bringing Economic Systems Together (Macroeconomics), The United States, and The World Economy.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 11th grade social studies; placement in Honors based upon 11th grade performance and teacher recommendation
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Participation in Government – 12 and 12H

The primary purpose of this one-semester course is to facilitate and encourage the development of civic-minded individuals capable of effectively fulfilling the office of ‘citizen’, which is a fundamental precept of democracy and right guaranteed by the Constitution.

The course poses challenges to each student:

  • acceptance of responsibility for active involvement in determining and delineating issues to be explored
  • pursuit of information needed to define, analyze, and develop resolutions to each issue
  • the carrying out of activities that support the resolution of each issue
  • the drawing together of relevant information, skills, and understandings from past educational and/or life experiences, and
  • focusing these on the resolution of real issues

Students must also assume the role of citizen as it applies to the program by accepting the responsibility for involvement and successful fulfillment of the tasks. Success in the course is contingent upon successful completion of a mandated community-service project.

Units of study include: Purposes of Government; the U.S. Constitution; Political Protest; Elections and Campaigns; Party Patterns and Voter Behavior; Political Spectrum and Ideology; Public Opinion, Mass Media and Propaganda; Interest Groups, Public Policy and the Budget Process, the Judicial System, Selected Amendments, and Supreme Court Cases.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 11th grade social studies; placement in Honors based upon 11th grade performance and teacher recommendation
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

U.S. History 1 and 2 SCCC

This course provides a survey of the development of the United States from the Civil War period to 1940. Students will analyze the Civil War, post-Civil War agricultural and industrial revolutions, urbanization, immigration, the emergence of the United States as a world power, World War I, and the Great Depression. This course also surveys and examines selected problems and opportunities facing the United States in the 20th century and 21st century. Students will analyze significant social, economic, and political changes in contemporary American life since 1940.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 11th grade social studies
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Credits: 1 high school and 6 college credits

Western Civilization I

This course is designed to be an introductory study of the political, economic, social, and cultural development of western society and its institutions. The period covered extends from the origin of civilization in the ancient Near East and the Mediterranean world to the Italian Renaissance.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 11th grade social studies
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Western Civilization II

This is a survey course on western history from the Italian Renaissance to the 20th Century. Particular emphasis is placed on the rise of the nation state, revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries, industrialization of Europe, and the impact of the modernization.

  • Grade: 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of 11th grade social studies
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Credits: ½

Social Studies – Independent Study

Please see the general guidelines for independent study. Permission of the instructor is required.

TECHNOLOGY

Principles of Engineering (Emphasizing Mathematics, Science, and Technology)

Principles of Engineering is an exploratory learning experience. Instead of merely showing a student how to use a technology, it lets them dissect that technology to get a better understanding of how it works. Through problem solving, the student will take their found knowledge and not only use, but often improve upon technology. In order to achieve this goal, students must explore materials and their properties, the design process, and testing strategies that will use concepts from both mathematics and physics. Students must also experiment with the different engineering systems, such as fluid, electrical, and mechanical. With completion of this course, students will be capable of applying its concepts to the everyday world and any career choice.

  • Grade: 11 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Design and Drawing for Production
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, project, portfolio
  • Credits: 1

Architectural Drawing

This course explores the theory of architectural design through past civilizations. The students will be able to identify architectural construction by the knowledge of certain historical periods throughout the years of civilization. Students will be required to develop a working knowledge of how to finance and construct a home using today’s technological advances in the construction field. Students will submit a complete set of working plans from which they will build a 1/4″ scale presentation model.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Successful completion of Design and Drawing for Production
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, portfolio
  • Credits: 1

Computer Aided Design

This course will expose the student to the current means of generating graphic designs with computers. The student will become familiar with computer terminology, history, components, applications, and design functions. This course will also review and discuss CAD/CAM. The majority of the time will cover and familiarize the student with the CAD system and solving graphic problems with the system through hands-on class work. The teacher will also assign a major design project.

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Design and Drawing for Production
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, portfolio
  • Credits: 1

Design and Drawing for Production

Design drawing for Production encourages visual and mechanical problem solving using common graphical language to describe forms in society. Through exercises developed within learning activities, the student is provided with opportunities to experience critical thinking, problem solving and decision making. The student will also be able to acquire Technical Drawing skills and experience creative design techniques. Recognizing the values, differences and importance of the individual learners, this course curriculum provides experiences for the student to function as a more skillful and knowledgeable citizen in his/her employment, community, environment, family and self. Drawing types explored include: engineering, perspective and sketching. Concepts covered in DDP are the design process, design principles, design styles, structural engineering and architecture.
***This course may be used to fulfill the Art/Music graduation requirement.***

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 40 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, portfolio
  • Credits: 1

Materials Processing

This course focuses on the classifying, properties, and processes of materials and the selection of those materials to be used in applications. Learners should be concerned with processes and materials used in metals, woods, plastics, ceramics, and composites. This course demonstrates unchanging processes used on different materials, as well as specific processes used on certain materials. This course also offers selection process of the use of materials in different applications. Special attention is given to safety in the work shop environment. Major activities include hands on projects, minor hands on projects, and safe techniques used to process materials.

  • Grade: 9 – 10
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, portfolio
  • Credits: ½

Production Systems

Almost everything we used today is manufactured on some sort of production line. Throughout this course, the understanding of manufacturing will constantly be learned. Things such as the inputs, processes, outputs, feedback, and goals will be what this course is based around. The designing of a product and the key elements preceding the actual building of the product, are very important steps that need to be learned in detail. Once the designing of the product is completed, the students will have a large hands-on production project to complete. The outcome of the course, in addition to hands on experience, will bring knowledge about how factories and industries work and will help in bringing that knowledge back into the classroom to make a small-scale manufacturing facility.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: Material Processing
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, portfolio
  • Credits: ½

Creativity and Innovation

This course will encourage the solution of technical problems using unconventional approaches. Given a defined supply of materials, students will use laboratory facilities in order to optimize a solution to stated technical problems. Topics include Methods of approaching Creativity and Innovation, Developmental Factors of Creativity and Innovation, and Cultural Impacts of Creativity and Innovation. Many of our projects are used for Science Olympiad

  • Grade: 10 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Materials Processing or permission of instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, project
  • Credits: 1/2

Transportation Systems

Transportation systems is a course that will acquaint students with a range of methods used to move people, materials, and products, across the land sea and air. The study of these systems will be the main focus of the course. The theory of operation and the scientific principles of the transportation systems will be included. Lab activities will include construction of model cars, planes, rockets, and boats. Students may also experiment with internal combustion engines that are used to power our transportation systems. Transportation systems, and the technology that is involved with them, is rapidly changing. These systems play an immeasurable role in the lives of students and citizens in the modern world. These systems right down to how the students arrived at school today affects every aspect of our lives. Knowing and understanding these systems will give students a real advantage in a world that revolves around transportation.

  • Grade: 9 – 12
  • Prerequisites: successful completion of Materials Processing or permission of instructor
  • Length: 20 weeks
  • Final Evaluation: test, project
  • Credits: 1/2