Kindergarten students get a hands-on look at the Math Masters program

Kindergarten students from Liberty Elementary School recently got a hands-on look at the Making Math Masters through Movement (MMMTM) initiative, a new program that will be incorporated into the school’s curriculum beginning next year.

The school will begin using the mats at the kindergarten level and in the school’s academic intervention service (AIS) and physical education classes. While those students begin to hop, walk, crawl and dance their way to mastering math concepts, the school will continue to train teachers to implement the mats in their classrooms. More information about how the mats will be incorporated across other grade levels will be announced during the 2018-19 school year.

The Liberty Central School District recently secured $5,000 through the Lowe’s Toolbox for Education grant, allowing the district to purchase activity mats for the MMMTM. MMMTM is a multi-sensory approach to teaching math the uses physical activity and visual elements. In short, it pairs learning with being physically active to make it more memorable and enjoyable. The mats align with current state standards and range in concepts, from addition and subtraction to angles and coordinates and place value and fractions.

Beginning in the 2018-19 school year, the elementary school will begin by implementing the mats at the kindergarten level and in the school’s academic intervention service (AIS) and physical education classes. While those students begin to hop, walk, crawl and dance their way to mastering math concepts, the school will continue to train teachers to implement the mats in their classrooms.

Among the reasons for a program like this is that eight of ten children are what’s known as kinesthetic learners, meaning that they learn best through movement – and the program taps into a child’s natural kinesthetic learning style.

The program is based on research that shows that moving during learning facilitates muscle memory, an important factor with younger children whose abstract thinking skills are not fully developed. Studies show this type of activity allows teachers and students to feel more energized, focused, and prepared to learn.

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