Don’t forget to sign up for “Here Comes the Bus”

Have you signed up for Here Comes the Bus yet?

The program allows caregivers to track their student’s bus, in real time. 

This year, Liberty Central School District and our transportation provider Rolling V Bus Corp. have partnered to help give parents and guardians the piece of mind of knowing where their child is through the “Here Comes the Bus” program.

Once signed up, parents and guardians can track their child’s bus through the computer or a mobile app, and get an email or push notifications once the bus gets close. If a bus is significantly off schedule, an email and push notification will also be sent.

To sign up, caregivers will need the school code, 29018, and their students’ school ID numbers, available through SchoolTool. Sign up can be done by signing in to https://login.herecomesthebus.com, and following the instructions. The mobile app can be downloaded via the Apple App Store or Google Play Store by searching “Here Comes the Bus.”

If a child has multiple last names separated by a space, the name should be input into the system with the space removed (ie Davis Jones would be DavisJones), as the system does not allow spaces.. Hyphenated names may be input as normal.

After signing up, it takes about 24 hours to be able to view the bus. At this time tracking is only available for regular morning and afternoon assigned bus routes. The app tracks the bus, not the student, so if a student is not on their regular bus, a parent or guardian will not be able to view the alternate route.

Here Comes the Bus offers several instructional videos, including How to register via desktop, How to register on a mobile device, How to add students, How to update and change notifications. More instructional videos are available on the website

There is also a page of frequently asked questions and a support page.

If parents and guardians are having difficulty tracking their child’s bus, they can reach out to Rolling V Liberty Bus Terminal at 845-292-4485 between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Sullivan BOCES Council seeks members

Sullivan BOCES Student/Parent Support Council is seeking new members.

The council is a group of parents, staff, board members and community stakeholders who meet three or four times per year to educate families and improve the educational experience at Sullivan BOCES.

The group will meet from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Nov. 15, 2022; Jan. 12, 2023; and April 6, 2023; at the Sullivan BOCES Rubin Pollack Education Center Career and Tech Dining Room, at 52 Ferndale-Loomis Road in Liberty.

Meetings will consist of sharing information on current topics and process and allowing time for members to give input on the needs of students and their families. Time is also set aside for families to network. Refreshments will be served.

The guest speaker for the Nov. 15 meeting will be from the Family and Community Engagement Center.

The Westchester Institute for Human Development operates early childhood and school-age FACE centers throughout seven counties, including Sullivan. The centers are part of the New York State Education Department Office of Special Education Educational Partnership network of support, designed to improve outcomes for students with disabilities and better support schools and families. The FACE centers can provide assistance to families of children with disabilities through free trainings and workshops; educational resources in English and Spanish; and direct consultation and referral assistance.

For more information on WIHD, visit www.wihd.orgThose who would like attend the Nov. 15 meeting are asked to RSVP by Nov. 1 to 845-295-4141 or malinda.Kristiansen@scboces.org

Take steps to prevent the flu

Flu season has begun, and it is important to take steps to help prevent the spread of the virus.

Flu, or influenza, spreads easily and can make people very sick, especially kids.

Following is important information from the state Department of Health:

Flu symptoms include:

Fever or chills, body aches, cough, sore throat, headache, runny or stuffy nose, feeling very tired. Some people, especially children, may have stomach problems and diarrhea. Unlike a cold, the flu comes on very suddenly.

Prevent the flu!

  • Flu vaccine is the best protection against the flu. It is recommended every year for everyone 6 months and older.
  • Get the flu vaccine for you and your children every year! It helps make flu sickness milder or prevents it altogether.
  • Getting the vaccine early in the fall means you and your children will be
  • protected when flu season starts.
  • Ask people close to your children, like babysitters and relatives, to get the vaccine, too.
  • The vaccine is especially important for people with certain health conditions, such as asthma, diabetes, heart or lung conditions because the flu can make them even sicker.

If your child gets the flu:

  • Your child will need plenty of rest and lots of fluids.
  • Keep your child home from school for at least 24 hours after their fever is gone without using fever-control medicine. This helps avoid giving the flu to others.
  • Talk with your child’s health care provider before giving a child any over-the-counter medicine.
  • Never give your child or teenager aspirin or any medicine that has aspirin in it. Aspirin can cause serious problems.
  • If your child gets flu symptoms and is younger than 5 or has a medical condition such as asthma, diabetes, or heart or lung disease, call their health care provider. Young children and those with certain medical conditions are at greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. Ask their health care provider if they recommend an antiviral drug.
  • If you are worried about your child, call their health care provider.

Don’t spread the flu!

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water aren’t handy, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow, not your hands. Put used tissues in the trash.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth. That’s how germs spread.
  • Stay away from people who are sick.

For more information, visit The Flu: A Guide for Parents on our website. 

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